Facebook

Tweet

Help

The far pavilion

For this long, narrow home, a modest frontage gives way to a double height central element followed by a beautiful indoor-outdoor pavilion at rear

Designed by Wulf Borrmeister, Borrmeister Architects

From the architects:

Project description:

Three contrasting forms come together in this family home – which was a solution to the challenge of a long and very narrow site and consciously fits in with its surrounding neighbours and the wider neighbourhood context.

The brief was for an easy to navigate, functional family home that would capture sun and maintain a strong connection to the outdoor spaces and greenery.

The narrow nature of the site running east to west meant the advantage of a long site frontage facing north – all the rooms in the house are filled with light.

Circulation areas were assigned to the back of house and rooms ran east to west following the site, achieving a simple, easy to read floor plan.


The entrance is halfway down the side of
The entrance is halfway down the side of the long, narrow home, with first the garage then double height internal void to the left as you approach the front door.

Garden strips were established along the northern and southern boundaries so that views out from rooms always provided a visual connection to the greenery.

The generous pavilion roof continues over the sheltered outdoor room which in turn connects to the main lawn. The pavilion also flows out onto an expansive floating deck via a band of sliding doors, creating easy indoor outdoor flow.

A modest frontage to the street gives the viewer only a hint of the architectural surprises which are revealed only as you venture into the site.

The pitch black steeped form that comprises the first floor and dramatic double height entry peaks behind the lower front of house.

Beyond the steeped form, the house drops down again to form an elegant elongated pavilion housing the living spaces which lead out into the outdoor room.

The house also offers multi-purpose shared spaces perfect for family life.

A study forms an intermediary space between the private bedrooms and living areas; floating feature timber stairs lead to the private master bedroom on the first floor; the living, dining and kitchen are naturally open plan; and the outdoor room also functions as a second living area.

And the pavilion and sprawling east deck by
And the pavilion and sprawling east deck by day – the house offers relaxed indoor outdoor flow. The front door entry is on the other side of the elongated home.

Sustainability:

The house has been designed to take advantage of natural sunlight and ventilation.

The floor plan has been thought out to allow maximum natural light into the open-plan living areas. Roof overhangs, sized to suit each façade, also protect the spaces from too much solar gain, so the house doesn’t over heat.

The house is also able to naturally ventilate with the open connections (stair well & void) from the ground to the first floor.

Furthermore, the compact and economical foot print, high level of insulation, thermally broken windows with high performance glass – as well as space for a well-stocked veggie garden and numerous fruit trees – answered the owners’ wish for an environmentally conscious home.

Credit list

Kitchen designer
Sarah Hooran Park, Borrmeister Architects
Interior designer
Sarah Hooran Park, Borrmeister Architects
Cladding
Triclad board and batten; Espan, standing seam, by Metalcraft; Herman Pacific Cedar Shiplap
Window/door joinery
Nulook All Seasons series
Paint
Resene Black White
Feature stairwell lighting
IKEA Dandelion pendant
Builder
Avenue Homes
Kitchen manufacturer
JB Joinery, Christchurch
Landscape designer
Debbie Rimmer
Roofing
E-Span and T-Rib, by Metalcraft; Vikings Butanol membrane
Flooring
Haro – engineered oak
Fireplace
XE005 wood fire

Designed by: Wulf Borrmeister, Borrmeister Architects

Story by: New Zealand TIDA Homes

Photography by: Sarah Rowlands

27 Jun, 2021

Award-winning new homes, renovations and interior design from New Zealand's top architects and designers illustrate the latest trends in home design


We know the Specialists

Related Book

TRENDS MINI COVER new homes -

We have got all the best ideas and advice to help you with your plans and ideas. 

Read More

Similar Stories