Sudima Christchurch City hotel offers boutique hospitality and connects guests to the Canterbury experience with everything from the architecture to the artworks

One building, two distinct uses – Sudima Laneway comprises Sudima Christchurch City hotel, spa and restaurant and an office building connected by an airy atrium

Story by: Charles Moxham Photography by: Sudima Hotels
One building, two distinct uses – office floors Sudima, Hotel, architecture, building, city, commercial building, facade, office space, boutique hotel, restaurant, spa
One building, two distinct uses – office floors are to the left, behind a glass curtain wall, while the boutique Sudima Christchurch City hotel to the right is clad in gold aluminium sheet, rounded at the corners, in empathy with the surrounding city architecture. The combined office, hotel, spa and restaurant building is called Sudima Laneway.

In a country as beautiful as New Zealand, itwould be easy for a hospitality firm to simply pay lip service to its charms – whether with a few glossy tourist photos or even an over-use of Kiwiana.

Luckily, there’s another way. When a boutique hotel introduces New Zealand artworks to evoke the land, over glossy snap shots, and makes sure the fish in its restaurant is sustainably caught, you know it’s about sharing an authentic connection and love of our land with business and tourist visitors alike.

This is the story at the new Sudima Christchurch City. In fact, Sudima Hotels already has a long string of hospitality and green accolades to its name, courtesy of its current hotels at Auckland Airport, Rotorua and Christchurch Airport. For example, Sudima was the first hotel group in New Zealand to be awarded a carboNZero certification.


The Sudima Laneway atrium’s two-canopy system keeps the architecture, building, Sudima Laneway, commercial building, mixed-use, Christchurch, Hotel, Office, Ignite Architects
The Sudima Laneway atrium’s two-canopy system keeps the rain out but lets fresh air and natural light penetrate deep into the building.

However, this new hotel takes things even further, providing a unique boutique experience for guests that connects them to the city, and the countryside.

To be fair, the hotel already has a great head start in terms of location, being ideally situated on Christchurch’s bustling Victoria Street, amidst an array of cafes, restaurants and bars. It’s also a stone’s throw from beautiful Hagley Park and just a short stroll from the city centre.

Even the hotel’s architecture reflects a strong sense of connection to the country’s tragically decimated and now rejuvenated South Island city.

Ignite Architects undertook the design of the hotel as well as addressing the bespoke interiors. Building project architect Neil Wyatt says the build comprises three elements, an office building, the hotel, and an airy atrium that divides the two.

“The office facade is predominantly clean-lined and glass, while the contrasting but complementary hotel has rounded corners and gold-hued aluminium panelling,” says Wyatt. “The hotel facade has a classic air with pleasing proportions and a touch of Modernism and even Art Deco about it – in keeping with the surrounding city environment.”   

The glass-clad central atrium plays an important part in the design both physically and symbolically.

“The two-canopy system keeps the rain out, while allowing light and fresh air to penetrate deep into the building,” says the architect.

“It helps animate the design, too, with office workers accessing their workplace via the atrium. The hotel ground-floor restaurant and bar – Vices & Virtues – also benefits from the pedestrian movement and natural light from the adjacent atrium.”

Plus symbolically, it’s as if the upmarket hotel is literally opening up to embrace the city vibe.

The hotel interiors are largely by Ignite as well, with the spa and restaurant and bar by interiors experts Luchetti Krelle. Lead designer on Ignite’s interior fit-out Phaedra  Applin says the focus on New Zealand and our pristine natural world is evidenced right from reception.

“This fit-out is very much about connecting to the New Zealand environment in an authentic way, and part of this is a lively, naturalistic use of wood. The reception desk isn’t a slick piece of polished timber, but rather it’s made of individual strip batons, that evoke the sense of a stand of layered trees.”

Natural materials or surfaces evoking nature feature throughout architecture, building, flooring, furniture, interior design, lobby, Sudima Laneway, Offices, Hotel, Ignite Architects
Natural materials or surfaces evoking nature feature throughout the Sudima Christchurch City fit-out by Ignite Architects, this cosy corner within the open reception space included.

The privacy screens in reception have a similar layered wood aesthetic, while pure wool New Zealand carpet provides luxury underfoot.

Throughout the hotel, reception included, cushions, casual throws, and furnishings are all textural and natural – letting guest get in touch with New Zealand in literal terms, whether in the hotel’s public spaces or in their own luxury suite.

One key feature of the bedrooms that illustrates Sudima Christchurch City’s authentic New Zealand experience is the bedhead in guest rooms. These feature evocative tonal paintings by up-and-coming New Zealand artist Aroha Gossage.

Plus, colours drawing on the natural environment that surrounds Christchurch – natural toned timber, terracotta and green – are to the fore in the Vices & Virtues restaurant-bar that looks to the atrium one way and to Victoria Street another.

Besides a generous use of wood, the facility features New Zealand handmade tiles on the bar and earthy custom terracotta flooring, says interior designer Jahnsen Razon of Luchetti Krelle.

For the Vices & Virtues restaurant/bar at Sudima architecture, building, cafeteria, furniture, interior design, mixed-use, restaurant, Sudima Laneway, Christchurch, Ignite Architects
For the Vices & Virtues restaurant/bar at Sudima Christchurch City, an exposed ceiling embraces the architectural elements of the new building. The adjacent atrium offers a bustling outlook for restaurant goers and hotel patrons.

The hotel interiors are largely by Ignite as well, with the spa and restaurant and bar by interiors experts Luchetti Krelle. Lead designer on Ignite’s interior fit-out Phaedra Applin says the focus on New Zealand and our pristine natural world is evidenced right from reception.

“This fit-out is very much about connecting to the New Zealand environment in an authentic way, and part of this is a lively, naturalistic use of wood. The reception desk isn’t a slick piece of polished timber, but rather it’s made of individual strip batons, that evoke the sense of a stand of layered trees.”

The privacy screens in reception have a similar layered wood aesthetic, while pure wool New Zealand carpet provides luxury underfoot.

Throughout the hotel, reception included, cushions, casual throws, and furnishings are all textural and natural – letting guest get in touch with New Zealand in literal terms, whether in the hotel’s public spaces or in their own luxury suite.

One key feature of the bedrooms that illustrates Sudima Christchurch City’s authentic New Zealand experience is the bedhead in guest rooms. These feature evocative tonal paintings by up-and-coming New Zealand artist Aroha Gossage.

Plus, colours drawing on the natural environment that surrounds Christchurch – natural toned timber, terracotta and green – are to the fore in the Vices & Virtues restaurant-bar that looks to the atrium one way and to Victoria Street another.

Besides a generous use of wood, the facility features New Zealand handmade tiles on the bar and earthy custom terracotta flooring, says interior designer Jahnsen Razon of Luchetti Krelle.

Wool carpets, natural furnishings and bedheads adorned with architecture, Sudima Laneway, Guest Room, Ignite Arhcitects
Wool carpets, natural furnishings and bedheads adorned with a print/painting by New Zealand artist Aroha Gossage feature in guest suites at the boutique hotel Sudima Christchurch City.

And it’s not only the restaurant decor that reflects our pristine environment – the menu does too. With things like sustainable line-caught fish, New Zealand-bred sous vide Angus eye fillet steak, and locally made Wairiri buffalo cheese on offer, the eatery really does give a taste of our land and sea.

“The distinctive Moss Spa is finished in natural Blackbutt timber, white painted brick and pastel colours to gives a minimal yet warm and relaxing environment for guests,” says Razon.

“Natural light drenches the Moss Spa lobby and nail salon, while the lighting in the private treatment rooms can be dimmed to create a serene setting.”

Sudima Christchurch City is about a real and enjoyable experience for all its guests.

Sudima Hotels is also proud to be one of the most accessible hotel groups in New Zealand, says Sudesh Jhunjhnuwala, CEO, Sudima Hotels.

“We go to great lengths to ensure all guests can enjoy their stay and have designed accessibility features into all our hotels – Sudima Christchurch City included.”

Aug 07, 2019

Credit list

Project
Sudima Christchurch City, Christchurch
Interior design
Ignite Architects; Luchetti Krelle
Structural design
WSP-Opus and New Zealand Consulting Engineers
Fire, hydraulic and electrical design
WSP-Opus
Project management
Savills
Passive fire protection
Advanced Applicators
Roof
Kingspan K100, Viking TPO membrane
Cladding
Alucoil and HD Clad, from Prime Design
Guest suite wallcoverings
Cole & Son Woods wallpaper
Architect
Ignite Architects; Neil Wyatt
Construction
ABL Construction
Quantity surveyor
Rawlinsons
Geotechnical design
KGA Geotechnical
Mechanical design & build
Airtech NZ
Cladding
Gold-colour aluminium panels, off-white fibre cement, dark glass
Glazing
Curtain wall, shopfronts, by Hagley Aluminium
Flooring
Guest rooms – Huka Falls 11 carpet with Eco backing, Parquet PQ1265 in Aged Oak; reception – Porcelanosa Reverso Grigio Patino floor tiles; Salisbury Street custom carpet Tile with eco backing, Queen Street plank 975 with eco backing
Paints
Resene
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