IKEA report reflects what Kiwis want for their home

New findings from a global IKEA report reveal that 71% of Kiwis want access to nature over city life and are willing to compromise the size of their home for it

Story by: Trends Ideas
The majority of Kiwis favour a smaller architecture, interior design, living room, real estate, white, black
The majority of Kiwis favour a smaller residence with a great location over a larger home in a less ideal place.

The fifth annual IKEA Life at Home Report, an annual study into global domestic living trends, shows that New Zealanders now, more than ever, are favouring smaller spaces in more desirable locations. The majority (70%) of Kiwis favour a smaller residence with a great location over a larger home in a less ideal place. While globally this shift indicates a greater desire for city living, for New Zealanders it suggests wanting to be closer to the great outdoors, with 71% prioritising access to nature over city convenience.

For the first time, the report identifies the five core emotional needs that most of the population globally believe their residential home should fulfil – privacy, comfort, ownership, security and belonging. 

While New Zealanders find privacy in their homes, a growing focus on co-living shows that many young Kiwis are struggling to fulfil their need for belonging, especially those living with other people. The report shows that 73% in co-living situations are seeking this need, while only 50% are having it met. As a result, one in four New Zealanders identify outside places where they feel more ‘at home’, a number that rises to one in three among city dwellers. 

The report explores how major global changes including urbanisation, digitalisation, urban living and the rise of technology impact the way we live and how people feel about life at home now and in the future.


While New Zealanders find privacy in their homes, home, house, interior design, property, real estate, window, brown, white
While New Zealanders find privacy in their homes, a growing focus on co-living shows that many young Kiwis are struggling to fulfil their need for belonging.

Will Edwards, New Zealand Market Leader says, “Home is no longer a refuge because who we live with is changing, where we live is more exposed and often shared, and what we live with, including work and other distractions, are putting privacy and belonging at a premium. 

This disruption means we’re now turning outside of our homes to meet our core emotional needs. At IKEA we believe that this gives people more opportunities to create the feeling of home, no matter where or how they live.” 

Out of all the core emotional needs, belonging is the most influential to the other four and can positively or negatively affect how a person feels about the other needs of the home. Interestingly, New Zealand families with young children are more likely to get belonging from their residential place (69%) compared to the global average (54%).

As young Kiwis are moving out of their parents’ homes and into their own living arrangements, research suggests that young adults may be in limbo as they craft a space that’s their own but still shared. More than a quarter (28%) of 18-24-year-olds don’t feel they get privacy from their residential homes and 32% must leave their home to find alone time.

New Zealand families with young children are architecture, elevation, facade, home, house, real estate, residential area, teal
New Zealand families with young children are more likely to get belonging from their residential place compared to the global average.

As a result, people are increasingly expanding their home beyond their four walls, and for Kiwis that means connecting with nature, especially when seeking solitude. After family and friend’s homes, New Zealanders turn to recreational, outdoor areas to feel at home, with 30% seeking to connect with the sights and sounds of the world around them. 

Today, having a home away from home is more important than ever with the majority (74%) of New Zealanders agreeing there are places they feel more at home in beyond their physical house. 

Within the home, New Zealanders especially turn to their bedrooms for relaxation and peace, and yet the majority (62%) are unhappy with their current space and seek a change – with financial restrictions the larger barrier (38%).

Within the home, New Zealanders especially turn to architecture, bedroom, ceiling, estate, home, house, interior design, real estate, room, window, gray, brown
Within the home, New Zealanders especially turn to their bedrooms for relaxation and peace.

Will adds, “At IKEA we understand what the heart of the home truly is and how to tap into those emotional needs to create that elusive feeling of home and make it your own no matter the type of space you live in. 

“Our goal is to make this feeling easier to achieve and to show all Kiwis how to redefine and take ownership of their space. Regardless of who you are living with, or if you’re owning or renting, your home should always be your sanctuary.”

Jan 14, 2019
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