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2021 TIDA International Home of the Year

Congratulations to the winners and finalists in the 2021 TIDA International Home of the Year –  top homes from leading architects and designers

Winner: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

SAOTA – Cape Town

With views of Table Mountain, Lion’s Head, Signal Hill, the city of Cape Town and the mountains of the Boland and the winelands in the distance, the architecture of this home is shaped to take in as much of the surrounding landscape as possible. 

The strongest gesture is the inverted pyramid roof which creates a clerestory window around the upper level.  

This allows the building to open up, capturing views of Table Mountain and Lion’s Head that would otherwise have been lost.  

Each level has its own set of courtyards and gardens which extend from the mountain surface down against the house, screening the neighbouring buildings and intensifying the relationship with nature.

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Judges' comments:

A gem of a house – both spatially & functionally.  

The simple plan with few walls makes for an open yet intimate series of spaces that are always in connection with the gardens and long views. 

An enticing entrance sequence of spaces together with the glass lantern roof hold the promise a rewarding experience if explored further - and this is certainly fulfilled when this exploration is undertaken.  

The use of the primary materials of timber, stone, concrete and painted brick creates a compact house that breaks down the barrier of inside/outside on this difficult but amazing site. 

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Runner-up: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Abramson Architects – Pacific Palisades

Situated on a promontory jutting into the canyon below, the hillside retreat boasts multiple vistas of the surrounding canyon and the Pacific Ocean beyond.

Local restrictions allowed for a single storey above street level. Responding to these conditions, much of the home’s massing is located on a lower-level that daylights onto the downslope side of the house.

Meticulous craftsmanship and authentic building materials are recurring themes, best exemplified by the widespread use of board-formed concrete walls, white oak shiplap cladding, and painted galvanised steel doors and windows.

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Judges' comments:

This expansive home is cleverly broken up into several blocks melding into the contour of the mountainous landscape and creating the illusion of several smaller interconnected structures. 

Bridges span between, connecting the spaces and allowing nature to extend into the heart of the home. 

The house opens up on all sides to the expansive panoramic views of mountains and ocean. Minimal in form, the architecture is empathic to its site.

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Armstrong Interiors – Christchurch

An earthquake damaged 1970s gem required a complete, contemporising renovation while retaining the character of the Mid-century modern home.

The outcome is a fully updated home, suitable for the changing demands of a contemporary family lifestyle.

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Banham Architects – Perth

Open and spacious with the ability to be separated into zones as required, this airy, heart-of-light beach house is as relaxed as its setting.

The resulting house has a striking modern aesthetic blended with natural materials. 

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

CplusC Architectural Workshop – Sydney

Quirky but refined this skilfully designed family home makes the most of the suburban site. 

The fun play of shapes and light define functional spaces.

Bold roof overhangs create outdoor rooms, soaring beams extending inside-out blur house and landscape, high level windows provide light but maintain privacy from the neighbours and circular carvings into solid walls provide soft cosy nooks for relaxing. 

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

dkstudio architects – Toronto

Located in an upscale Toronto neighbourhood, this home replaces a simple, neglected bungalow from the 1940s, and was designed for a couple with a passion for contemporary art and architecture.

Composed of wood, glass, limestone, and steel, it is unapologetically modern, rising two floors above ground and mirrored below ground with a two-level basement.

The exterior is composed of stone and timber rectangular volumes that intersect and stack upon one another. Straight lines and a rectangular structure create a clean, refined look.

This home is as much an art piece as the items inside its walls.

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Fowler Homes – Christchurch

This timber clad costal Christchurch home emulates forms of the bygone seaside cottages with asymmetrical gable forms accentuated by negative spaces between. 

The home is elevated on timber piles, reminiscent of a jetty projecting into the sea, anchored to the land and rocks by a concrete block garage. 

The design aims to allow estuary views from all living areas of the house. 

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Tim Gorter Architect – Los Angeles

This modernisation and expansion a modest tract home that the owners had lived in for more than 30 years heightened features they had always appreciated and resolved long-standing frustrations with the original design.

The redesign preserves the bones of the existing structure, but transforms it from a cramped, dark, and dated space into an open and daylit home imbued with Mid-century modern character.

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Noel Jessop Architecture – Hamilton

The simple long, low room that forms the ground floor of this family home allows the spaces to connect to the environment, offers light open spaces and is orientated to flood every room with morning sun.

The first floor “Kids Box” pivots 90° in plan from the ground floor, generating a generous cantilever to the East and West.

The first floor opposes the ground floor in plan, while the purpose-built geometric aluminium screen – often referred to as the ‘’Scales’’ – adds further juxtaposition, contrasting the timber skin below.

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

South Architects – Christchurch

Materials that age beautifully and a sense of togetherness over generations all come together in this sculptural, modern home.

A clear hierarchy of spaces is evident, with spaces staggered across the plot, organising the garden as well as the house.

Under the beautiful undulating plywood soffit, the folding roof organises the spaces, binds them into one home and creates a strong sense of indoor/outdoor. 

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Finalist: 

TIDA International Home of the Year

Terry & Terry Architecture – San Francisco

This transformation of  a 1950s  Joseph Eichler home is designed for a young deaf family, who wanted an expanded open plan that incorporates Deaf-Space. 

The result is a sense of transparency throughout the home, in which vision and touch are a primary means of spatial awareness and orientation.

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Story by: Trendsideas

13 Mar, 2022

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