Glass, steel and stone

Contemporary-style bathrooms have been createdto suit different needs in this home
View of the vanity in this bathroom architecture, daylighting, tourist attraction, gray, black
View of the vanity in this bathroom

The rooms that go into a house are usuallydictated by the needs of the owners. The design specifics of each room will be governed by a number of additional factors.

In creating bathrooms for this contemporary-style home, architect Ed Niles took a number of things into consideration, some of which may not immediately spring to mind when you think of bathroom design.

"I wanted the home's master bathroom to be set away from the bedroom, but still needed to consider critical bathroom stops in the middle of the night," says Niles.


A bathroom lined with panels of stainless steel bathroom, ceiling, glass, interior design, lighting, plumbing fixture, product design, room, sink, tap, black, gray
A bathroom lined with panels of stainless steel

"I placed it as far away as I thought the owners would be prepared to stumble in the dark."

Access to the bathroom is via a long, glass-floored corridor, lined with metallic doors concealing some of the home's storage spaces. The roof above is a skylight, with the level of light entering the space moderated by the use of slatted louvers. Just before the double glass doors that lead to the bathroom are two smaller rooms to the left and right, the owners' individual dressing rooms.

Round in shape, the room is effectively cut in half by a large marble console. It forms two facing vanities, with sinks carved into the counters on either side. This was part of the architect's plan for a design that allowed two people to use the bathroom at the same time, without getting in each other's way.

A glass-floored corridor leading to the master bathroom ceiling, daylighting, interior design
A glass-floored corridor leading to the master bathroom

Features such as the bath on one wall and the large multi-headed shower on the opposite wall have been contoured to fit against the rounded walls of opaque glass. These let in plenty of light but still maintain the necessary levels of privacy in a room that has an elevated location in the house. The room also doubles as a mini-gym, when the owners make use of exercise equipment located in the open space at the end of the room.

Other bathrooms around the house have also been tuned to their specific uses. The bathroom that services the home's outdoor living and pool area has a more utilitarian flavor than other bathrooms around the house. This is emphasized by the stainless steel walls and the simple lines of the glass and timber counter.

In the home's guest house, the half-circle shape of the separate structure has led to the creation of wedge-shaped bathrooms. By cleverly placing the necessary features such as countertops and baths, these spaces still manage to comfortably contain all that is necessary.

Apr 24, 2003

Credit list

Architect
Edward Niles Architect FAIA (Malibu, CA)
Main contractor
Maier-Boysen
Flooring
Limestone
Master bathroom - bathtub
Interior design
Marybeth Waterman and Steve Adams
Window and door joinery
Kynar finished aluminum from Fleetwood
Lighting
Halo
Vanity
Carved stone with under-counter bowls from Kohler
Interior design
Marybeth Waterman and Steve Adams
Window and door joinery
Kynar finished aluminum from Fleetwood
Lighting
Halo
Vanity
Carved stone with under-counter bowls from Kohler
Main contractor
Maier-Boysen
Flooring
Limestone
Master bathroom - bathtub
Faucets and shower fittings
Domani in Brushed Chrome from Dornbracht
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